Lauren Bon and Metabolic Studio,  Accretion Lab, the agency of salt water and sunlight in metabolic form, 2022-2024, aquariums, steel mesh boats, solar power, Salton Sea water, Biorock, wires.

christy roberts berkowitz – Lauren Bon and Metabolic Studio – Gerald Clarke – Noé Montes – Samantha Morales Johnson – Stuart Palley – Lorene Sisquoc

February 15 – May 19, 2024

Guest curated by Debra Scacco, Conduit uncovers how the diversion of water has shaped the way we live through a critical examination of the tension between urban growth and the natural world. Cities world-wide are built around water sources, and the same is true of our own city. The rivers, lakes, wetlands and streams that sustained Indigenous peoples have undergone dramatic transformations, and have been dammed, piped and diverted beyond recognition. Some, like the Santa Ana River, are corseted in concrete to support urban expansion while stripping the river of her strength, and attempting to force the natural world to accommodate the human needs of growing communities. Through contemporary art works and archival materials, Conduit examines the ongoing impacts of colonial water diversion, and dares to speculate that a different future is possible. Artists featured include: christy roberts berkowitz, Lauren Bon and Metabolic Studio, Gerald Clarke, Noé Montes, Stuart Palley and Lorene Sisquoc.

Conduit is made possible, in part, by a grant from The Inland SoCal Creative Corps, a component fund at The Inland Empire Community Foundation.

Ontario Art Walk & Exhibit Reception: Conduit

Saturday, February 17, 2024

6 PM – 9 PM

Tour with Guest Curator, Debra Scacco at 7 PM

Free – All Ages – Refreshments Provided

Enjoy light refreshments and art-making activities throughout the evening as we also celebrate the opening of the exhibit, Conduit. Enjoy a live DJ set by Cam Gnarly, meet the guest curator and exhibiting artists inside the galleries and learn more about the exhibit. To find out more about Ontario Art Walk, visit ontarioartwalk.org.

Stuart Palley, Last Stand of the Joshua Tree, 2015, archival photographic print.

Noé Montes, Pyrite Channel, Archival inkjet print, 2019.

christy roberts berkowitz, Vanishing Point (side one), 2020, charcoal on vellum.

Gerald Clarke, One Tract Mind, 2009, canvas, artificial turf, wood, and acrylic paint.

Lorene Sisquoc, Ponu’s Story (Video Still), digital presentation

Samantha Morales Johnson, The Land Reflects the History: Toyon, Elderberry, Bay Laurel, 2023, Japanese ink on paper.

First Thursdays: Artist Discussion: 

Conduit

Thursday, March 7, 2024

6 PM – 7:30 PM

All Ages Welcome

Join artist Noe Montes and UC Riverside Public Humanities scholar Catherine Gudis to discuss Montes’ work focusing on Jurupa Valley Superfund site Pyrite Canyon. For more than 20 years, Montes’ award-winning artwork has documented underrepresented communities to effect change through storytelling, education and advocacy around social, economic, and environmental issues. Experience First Thursdays at the Museum and enjoy extended hours from 5p – 8pm.

Artist Conversation with Gerald Clarke

Saturday, March 16, 2024

12 PM – 1:30 PM

All Ages

Join Conduit exhibited artist Gerald Clarke and guest curator Debra Scacco for a conversation about water rights, American Indian stereotypes and the role water plays in Indigenous culture. Gerald Clarke is a visual artist, educator, tribal leader, cultural practitioner and an enrolled citizen of the Cahuilla Band of Indians.   

Gerald Clarke is currently a Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California Riverside where he teaches classes in Native American art, history and culture. Clarke has exhibited his work extensively and can be seen in numerous exhibitions as well as major museum collections. In 2020, the Palm Springs Art Museum hosted Gerald Clarke: Falling Rock, the first major retrospective of the artist’s work. He holds a B.A. in Art from the University of Central Arkansas and the M.A./M.F.A. degrees in Painting/Sculpture from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Basketry and Mother Earth Clan with Lorene Sisquoc

Sunday, April 7, 2024

1 PM – 4 PM

All Ages

Join curator and basket-maker Lorene Sisquoc to learn about Mother Earth Clan and participate in a Creekside round reed basket workshop. Lorene Sisquoc is curator of the Sherman Indian Museum, has taught basket-making and native plant uses and material culture/traditions at the Sherman Indian High School and throughout Southern California for many years. Sisquoc is a descendant of the Mountain Cahuilla and a member of the Fort Sill Apache tribe.

Studio Saturdays: Earth’s Canvas & Upcycled Art 

Saturday, April 20

12 PM – 4 PM

All Ages Welcome

Celebrate Earth Day at the Museum in collaboration with the Integrated Waste Department. Meet Recycle Roo and learn about source separation, attend a composting demonstration, create upcycled art and make your own paper out of plants using a bicycle! Learn more how artists are using art to talk about our earth’s resources in a special gallery walkthrough at noon with Conduit guest curator Debra Scacco and exhibited artist christy roberts berkowitz.

This exhibit explores the unique history of Ontario—it’s founding, transitions, people and organizations. Explore Ontario from its roots beginning with the Native Peoples and Californio Rancheros to its founding by George Chaffey. Discover why it has been called both a “Model Colony” and the “Gem of the Foothills.” The book, Ontario The Gem of the Foothills by Michael L. Rounds, traces Ontario history from the Native American era to the present day. Many historic images from the museum’s collections are published here for the first time. This interpretive history about our community is for sale in the museum store.